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EP269: A Family Lived in the New York Public Library?, Her Career is a Tribute to Her Great Uncle and A Fake Ring, Real Temptation, and a Golden Marriage

Our American Stories / Lee Habeeb
The Truth Network Radio
April 19, 2022 3:05 am

EP269: A Family Lived in the New York Public Library?, Her Career is a Tribute to Her Great Uncle and A Fake Ring, Real Temptation, and a Golden Marriage

Our American Stories / Lee Habeeb

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April 19, 2022 3:05 am

On this episode of Our American Stories, Kristin O'Donnell Tubb, author of  John Lincoln Clem: Civil War Drummer Boy, tells the story of the family that lived in the New York Public Library. Heather McPherson tells us how her Great Uncle inspired her to become the Curator of History at the South Carolina Military Museum. Sarah Wells, author of American Honey: A Field Guide to Resisting Temptation, shares her experience overcoming temptation.  

Support the show (https://www.ouramericanstories.com/donate)

 

Time Codes:

00:00 -  A Family Lived in the New York Public Library?

10:00 - Her Career is a Tribute to Her Great Uncle

23:00 - A Fake Ring, Real Temptation, and a Golden Marriage

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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Notably, the 1913 article focused on his new invention, an air purifier that promised to suck everything from arsenic to iron particles out of the air. Our audience loved Kristen O'Donnell-Tubb's wonderful story from her historical fiction book John Lincoln Clem, Civil War drummer boy. So we asked if she would share another story with us. Here she is telling the story of the family that lived in the New York Public Library. Once upon a time, a girl was born inside a library. And not just any library, the New York Public Library. Yep, the big famous building on Fifth and 42nd.

The one with the lions out front. The date was May 8, 1917. Two French dignitaries happened to be visiting the library that week, Prime Minister René Viviani and Marshal Joseph Joffre. The girl's parents were stumped for a name for their daughter and a guest at the party suggested combining these two dignitaries' names. And so the girl born inside the NYPL became Viviani Joffre Fiedler. Viviani was the first daughter and third child of John and Cornelia Fiedler. John Fiedler was hired as the building superintendent when the iconic library was under construction. He, Cornelia, and their two sons, John Jr. and Edward, moved into the library in July 1910, ten months before the library opened to the public on May 23, 1911. They lived in an eight-room apartment on the mezzanine level of the library. This apartment is where Viviani was born and she's thought to be the only child ever born inside the building.

The footprint of the apartment is still there today. Viviani, Edward, and John Jr. had quite a childhood inside those marble walls. They later recounted stories of playing baseball inside the library using books as bases. The library often hosted dignitaries at lavish parties inside the stunning building.

And when Viviani was six, she recited poetry to Queen Marie of Romania in the children's collection. Because they were not allowed to have pets, John Jr. once trapped pigeons on the roof until the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals caught wind of this and requested he free them. Viviani and her friends would slide down the banisters and play hide and seek among the library's priceless marble statues while her brothers played war in the basement. And once, a thief was caught trying to steal a rare $10,000 stamp collection from a library display. John Sr. was quite a character and to prevent his three children from getting into too much mischief in the late night library, he told his kids in his distinct Bowery dialect that the library was haunted by a man killed during construction. Viviani later told the New Yorker magazine that the library is, quote, like a big marble grave at night after the cleaners are gone. The idea that the NYPL is haunted is now quite entrenched in the building's history and the opening scene of the original Ghostbusters movie pays homage to that belief. Peter, at 1.40 p.m. at the main branch of the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue, ten people witnessed a free floating full torso vaporous apparition.

It blew books off shelves from 20 feet away and scared the socks off some poor librarian. I'm very excited. I'm very pleased. I want you to get right down there. Check it out and get back to me. No, no.

Get right back. Peter, you're coming with us on this one. Spengler went down there. He took PKE valences, went right off the top of the scale, buried the needle. We're close on this one.

I can feel it. John Jr. told the New York Times years later, quote, There was some basis for the legend. Ten men died in the nine or ten years it took to build the Central Library. The reading room ghost was one who had fallen from the scaffolding when they were putting in the reading room ceiling.

At least that's the way father told it. The elder, John Fiedler, was also an inventor and worked with Thomas Edison. His workshop in the basement is still there today. He called it his private laboratory.

He was known to have quote dabbled in plastics long before the word got into the dictionary. The Fiedler children had many friends in the area. Some of them lived in the Algonquin Hotel, some in Rogers Peep Department Store.

This group of friends truly had a unique playground. Viviani lived in the library until she was 15 years old, leaving when she got married. John Jr. took over as the building superintendent from his father, retiring in June 1949. All told, the Fiedlers lived inside the New York Public Library for 38 years. You can read more about the Fiedler family and their adventures inside the New York Public Library in two books about their lives, The Story Collector and its sequel, The Story Seeker.

And a special thanks to Kristen O'Donnell-Tubb for her storytelling and what a gig. What a beautiful way to grow up. The reading room may be my favorite place in all of New York City. I can't tell you how many hours I spent there as a boy. Just love the place.

And that reading room, well, you're going to read. The story of John Fiedler, the family that lived in the New York Public Library here on Our American Story. Folks, if you love the stories we tell about this great country, and especially the stories of America's rich past, know that all of our stories about American history, from war to innovation, culture, and faith, are brought to us by the great folks at Hillsdale College, a place where students study all the things that are beautiful in life and all the things that are good in life. And if you can't get to Hillsdale, Hillsdale will come to you with their free and terrific online courses.

Go to hillsdale.edu to learn more. And we continue with Our American Stories. And on this show, we consider it a privilege to honor those who have given their lives in combat for others. And so does Heather McPherson, who is the curator of history at the South Carolina Military Museum.

In fact, it's the reason she's at the museum in the first place. Here's Heather to tell us more. So when I was growing up, my mom had photos on our piano of her uncles. And I was always interested in this one, like, I want to know his story. His name was Ralph Ferguson. And he served in the 29th Division during World War II and landed on Omaha Beach, first wave, and made it to June 12th before he was killed in action.

It was about 12 miles in near the El River. So I grew up kind of hearing bits and pieces of that story. And, you know, throughout teenage, you get other priorities when you're a teenager and everything. But I loved history class and stuff like that. But I was kind of, you know, every once in a while I dig into his story a little bit.

And then after college, I really dove into it. There's so much more available on the internet and getting in contact with people and just kind of made it like a side mission of mine to figure out his story. And I just kind of found some sense of purpose trying to tell his story. The family didn't really talk about it. Brothers didn't want to mention him, the mother. And so my grandma grew up not knowing a lot about what happened to him. And same with his widow, didn't really know a lot. So me being able to piece together his few days in country and what he might have gone through and, you know, even finding mentions of him in books and stuff, it was just really incredible journey and just got me more interested in other aspects of World War II and then eventually other military in general.

Yeah, I actually found a mention of him in one of Stephen Ambrose's books. One of the soldiers under his command, he was the second lieutenant in the 29th Division. He was talking like he always felt sorry for him because he had to read his soldier's mail and censor it. And he knew that he was getting really close to these men after having to censor their mail and that he didn't want to lose any of them. And he, you know, it kind of reminded me of him taking care of his younger brothers and his younger sisters always being the man of the house because he actually lost his father a year before he got deployed. So he was like, I'm torn.

I want to take care of my men, but I know my family needs me at home. And it's just, you know, World War II was just an era where so many people stepped up and did what they needed to do. He's writing letters back home, like, you know, his mother's learning how to drive for the first time because she doesn't have someone to do that for.

And, you know, talking to my grandmother like, well, haven't you learned how to drive yet Bertha and help mother fill the car with gas? And I could just sense this pull of him wanting to be in two places at once. And there's no telling what he went through on the beaches of Omaha, along with so many other of our brave men getting separated from where they were supposed to land and just so much going on. And then leading his men across the El River.

I've heard a couple little excerpts of he was probably one of the first ones to kind of go ahead. That's what leaders did. They wanted to keep their men out of harm's way.

And, you know, they took the point. Not sure how he got killed. It could have been artillery, could have been a sniper. But it's one of those things where I started kind of talking about him and my grandmother started sharing stories I'd never heard before. It almost like kind of clicks her memory and like, oh, yeah, well, he used to he worked at a drugstore. So he came home smelling like coal pills. I don't know what they were putting in those pills, but they're these little black pills and they smelled like coal.

And I was like, well, it is West Virginia, so everything smells like coal. But yeah, it's just these little stories of that she didn't even knew she remembered. It's definitely been a journey when you spend that many years researching and really getting to know the person that you've never met. Even my mom said, you know, I never really met him, but you've you've almost brought him to life for me.

And finally made the pilgrimage, if you will, to Normandy in twenty nineteen and got to see his grave and going to see his his grave site. It was like, why am I getting so emotional about someone I've never met? But it's like I did know him and being able to share that with with everyone that I was part of the tour with, went with the 29th Division Association. And I was trying to I'll just go by myself, but the tour group was going there. So I'm like, well, then I can't just go and not not go see the grave site. So I was like, OK, so all these people are now watching this moment that I've been looking forward to for a while.

And, you know, they actually have an attendee come with you and you can actually rub sand in in the engraved part of the the cross. So the letters really pop and actually signifies, you know, someone who knew this person has come to visit it. So I've got one person standing behind me in this little tour group looking on. I'm like, oh, this is awkward. But it was it just felt like the circle was complete. Like I eventually had time just to go back by myself and kind of say, hey, Ralph, how you doing? You know, it's it's it really is like I know him. And I think it didn't hit me to like maybe a little bit later, like, OK, yes.

Takes pictures. Just make sure. And, you know, I was here. I visited and tell everybody, like, oh, this is his story. But then later on, I was like, OK, that was that was a moment.

And yeah, it kind of weighs on you after it a little bit. But yeah, that was it was incredible. I think that was even more impacted when I went to that the actual river where he passed away because it was on June 6th that we had laid some roses down at one of the memorials. So I'd taken that rose. I was like, I'm going to spread some of the petals in the river. I don't know what I was thinking, but it just seemed like the right thing to do.

So I did that. And, you know, we were just kind of looking around the river a little bit more. And let's let's head down down a little bit. And those rose petals were there circling. And I was like, well, OK, that's that's so weird. So we stood there for a little bit. And I was like, all right, I guess time to go. And then the rose petals left right when I left. And I was like, OK, that's something something's going on here.

I don't I haven't had really any more experiences like that. But to see those rose petals like waiting on me almost and then leaving as I left, it was almost like Ralph, like, thanks for for keeping my story alive. Stayed in a bed and breakfast that was literally like two miles from where he was killed. And now that family who runs the bed and breakfast, he also has a tour group. And my great uncle's story gets to be told multiple times throughout the year.

And his picture is right on the roadside. And it's it's just incredible how it how it all turned out. My voice is cracking because of it, but I'm trying not to. It's hard.

I mean, it's hard. And I think that's why I love working here is because I know how it feels. And so, you know, even yesterday I was talking to one of our donors.

We're going to be showcasing his family at one of our displays. And he's like, I'm just so thankful that you're doing this for us because, you know, they have the story, but it's almost like they do want to share it. And it's not just for them, like, I want to share what what these people did. It's like they want to keep that memory alive. And the more people you tell about it, the more it feels like, you know, well, that person's going to remember that story. It just keeps trickling on. These people who are no longer with us have connected so many other people and from different states, but also from the United States to France.

It's like the the people I stayed with were one was British, one was Dutch. But now they take care of a marker where my great uncle died from West Virginia. So it's like these stories bring the whole world together and it's out of something so horrible. But out of it comes something so great as you connect people and keep these memories alive of good sons and daughters making the ultimate sacrifice.

And it just connects everyone in the world. So you almost forget when you're reading stories that these are people and they had families and a lot of people forget about families even serving today that they were serving just alongside, you know, their men and women in uniform. So that's what pulls me in is the stories and keeping them alive because almost like the more stories I keep alive in the museum, that's one more kind of checkmark for Ralph going good job, you know, keeping that story alive. And a special thanks to Robbie for doing that story, producing it, bringing it to us. And a special thanks to Heather McPherson for telling the story.

She's a curator of history at the South Carolina Military Museum. And telling stories is what she does. And telling stories of those who've paid, well, a real price so that we can enjoy the inheritance we have here in this country. And it's an inheritance, folks.

And we didn't do anything for it, so many of us. And my goodness, what a story she told about her great uncle. And all triggered by those pictures on the top of a piano. Who are those people, she thought, the curiosity drove her. And she got to know Ralph Ferguson, really got to know him. Never met him, but she really got to know him.

The 29th Division in World War Two, he stormed Omaha Beach. What a beautiful story about memory and the power of stories. Heather McPherson's story, her great uncle Ralph Ferguson's story, here on Our American Stories. Soon millions will make Medicare coverage decisions for next year. And UnitedHealthcare can help you feel confident about your choices. For those eligible, Medicare Annual Enrollment runs from October 15th through December 7th. If you're working past age 65, you might be able to delay Medicare enrollment depending on your employer coverage.

It can seem confusing, but it doesn't have to be. Visit UHCmedicarehealthplans.com to learn more. UnitedHealthcare, helping people live healthier lives. I know everything there is to know about running a coffee shop. But for small business insurance, I need my State Farm agent. They make sure my business stays piping hot.

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Purchase All-Free Clear Mega Packs today and conquer any laundry load for all fabric types. And we continue with our American stories and our next story comes to us from Sarah Wells, author of American Honey, a Field Guide to Resisting Temptation. Let's take a listen. I grew up on a farm in the frayed edge of suburbia. I would say it was an Auburn township, pretty traditional upbringing with a stay at home mom and the working class dad, kind of a pull yourself up from the bootstraps type of home life. And that was what I expected the future to look like. I had one degree in mind when I would graduate from college and that was my MRS. I had dreams of being a writer, of teaching, but it was always in the background that what would really happen is I would meet the man of my dreams and we would live happily ever after.

I would stay home and raise my kids just like my mom had done. And so that was the mission that I had coming into high school and into my college career, always keeping in mind my dad. My dad was this and is somebody that I've always looked up to tremendously. I adored my dad and wanted to be with my dad all the time and he was kind of my model for the kind of man that I wanted to marry. And so I went through, like many girls do, a boy crazy phase where from probably the age of 13 to 21, I had a boyfriend every month, long-term boyfriend relationships. And as soon as that one would end, I would start in and find a new one. And I really craved love and adoration.

My dad was a hardworking dad and he was always gone early in the morning, working late into the evening. And I think that I craved his attention so much that I had kind of a gaping hole of desire from a young teenager all the way through to college. Eventually, I met my now husband, Brandon. We met when I was 19 and I was ready to marry him 10 days into dating him.

I was certain that he was going to be the one, but I was also certain that every previous boyfriend was going to be the one. So this isn't actually like amazing information that I had met my husband. And so we dated for 10 months and got engaged and got married four months later. And after my husband proposed to me, I was rifling through his side dresser drawer looking for receipts for the dinner that we had gone on the night that he was engaged.

I was putting together a scrapbook to memorialize our short engagement. And I came across a receipt that I thought was the dinner receipt. It turned out to be the receipt for my engagement ring, which looked beautiful. It was shiny and I love to look at it. I loved everyone who complimented it. And I was like, yes, it is a beautiful ring. Thank you. But it turned out that my ring was not what I thought it was.

It turned out to be on sale at a department store. It was far less than what I thought he had spent on my ring. And these things are things that I didn't think mattered to me. I didn't think that it was a big deal to wear expensive rings. I didn't wear expensive jewelry.

I was a kind of dirt under your fingernails type of girl. But that mattered. And the need to feel worthy and to be invested in as his future bride mattered to me. It was really hard to get over it. And I wanted to just suck it up and go on and just get married.

But I couldn't do it. It was too big of a block to our relationship. And so I confronted him about it and asked him like, or I didn't ask him. I told him I found the receipt for my ring. And obviously he knew immediately that this was a problem. So what I was used to, another expectation that I had growing up was that people didn't really say they're sorry.

They would be defensive or redirect blame. And when I confessed to my husband, my fiance at the time that I had found this receipt, I expected him to be defensive and to make a big deal about it and turn it back on me. And when instead he apologized and asked for forgiveness, I was blown away.

Like, oh, this man is not exactly who I thought he was in a good way. But marriage ended up being a whole lot more work than I expected. And then having babies ended up being a whole lot more work than I expected. It didn't work out just that you got pregnant. It actually turned out that you got pregnant and then didn't get pregnant and miscarried or struggled to get pregnant. I had two miscarriages before we had our first child, our daughter, Lydia.

Then I thought, oh, well, this is it. I'm, I'm back on track. I'm happily married. My husband has a job.

I'm going to stay home with my daughter who is beautiful and tiny and cute. And about six weeks into my maternity leave, I felt like half my brain had fallen out of my head and I couldn't put half of a sentence together anymore. And I called my boss and was like, I have to come back to work. I don't know who I am.

I don't know how I'm going to do this. And I was 24 at the time. And all of this turned into this early twenties, late twenties, a season of thinking that I was one type of person and discovering that I was actually a whole other kind of person. I learned that I looked up to my dad, not because that was maybe the type of guy I wanted to marry, but the kind of person that I was. I was a hardworking person.

I loved to invest all of myself into a team of people or into projects and that kind of thing. And my husband ended up being the stay at home parent and being the one who was raising our children, which was shocking to everyone involved, including us, myself and my husband. I knew that things at home when I took my full time job were not great for my husband.

He wasn't enjoying being a stay at home dad nearly as much as he thought he might. But I didn't have a real good picture until one morning we were dancing around each other in the kitchen, getting breakfast ready. I was in my pantsuit with my travel mug and my phone and my purse and was ready to walk out the door to the job that I loved and that I felt like suddenly I was made for. And my husband was in his warm up pants and an untucked T-shirt and he was not shaven for the last however many days, who knows. And our daughter is screaming in the high chair and my infant son is wailing in the rocker and I go to pass my husband on the way out of the kitchen and say, goodbye, I'll see you at lunch.

And he slams the kitchen cabinet and turns to me and screams, I hate my life. And you've been listening to Sarah Wells tell the story of her life and ultimately her family life. Well, we're going to find out how that ends and how that works. When we come back with Sarah Wells story, her book, American Honey, a Field Guide to Resisting Temptation.

Her story, her husband's continues here on our American story. Soon millions will make Medicare coverage decisions for next year. And UnitedHealthcare can help you feel confident about your choices. For those eligible, Medicare annual enrollment runs from October 15th through December 7th. If you are working past age 65, you might be able to delay Medicare enrollment depending on your employer coverage.

It can seem confusing but it doesn't have to be. Visit UHCmedicarehealthplans.com to learn more. UnitedHealthcare, helping people live healthier lives. I know everything there is to know about running a coffee shop. But for small business insurance, I need my State Farm agent. They make sure my business stays piping hot.

And I stay cool and confident. See, they're small business owners too. So they know how to help you best. State Farm is in your corner and on it. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.

Call your local State Farm agent for a quote today. Doing household chores can already be time consuming and tedious. And there's nothing more daunting than facing piles and piles of laundry that need to be done.

I mean, that can be overwhelming for anyone. So if you want to get those larger laundry loads done right and get back to your life, try all free clear mega packs. All free clear mega packs are bigger packs with two times the cleaning ingredients compared to a regular pack so that you can tackle any laundry load without the worry. All free clear mega packs are also 100% free of perfumes and dyes and they're gentle on skin, which is great for any family's sensitive skin needs. Which my family, we definitely have sensitive skin. So the next time the whole family gets home from long vacation or you get the kids back from summer camp or whatever the situation is that's caused this big pile of dirty clothes, just know that all free clear mega packs, they have your back.

Purchase all free clear mega packs today and conquer any laundry load for all fabric types. And we continue with our American stories and author Sarah Wells, her memoir, American Honey, a field guide to resisting temptation. When we last left off, her husband was expressing some discontent with being a stay at home dad.

Let's pick up where we last left off. I hate my life. And I'm like, what? It felt completely out of the blue. And I didn't know what to say because I was so shocked that the life that I felt like we were was it kind of a dream life because I had everything I wanted. I had the husband, I had a job, I had children.

I couldn't see how he couldn't see the beauty of our life. He was struggling to find work. We found a church community and started to build friendships and that helped. We started to go on dates on a weekly basis to try to stay connected in that way. But what he really needed was to find another outlet and a work outlet.

The stay at home parent thing wasn't working for him. He eventually found work and was and began working as a contractor for ESPN and Fox and started working on the road. Sometimes I would get to go with him and it was heaven. We went to dinner, we would go out dancing and sing karaoke and do all these things that we love together and made each other laugh.

And then we would come home and reality would sink back in. He would go back on the road by himself and I would go back to work by myself. And in the midst of all of that, other people became very important to me. My friends became very important to me, but also conversations with other people became really important. And I was blindsided by a developing friendship with a friend who was a man and we totally hit it off. I was in a writing community and he shared a lot of the same interests and we just really connected.

He was funny. We started texting a lot and suddenly we were texting a whole lot and all of a sudden I realized how much I was sharing of my life with this stranger out of the kind of out of the blue and not with my husband. One day I had been texting with this person on and off throughout the day. I felt really uneasy about it and told my husband, hey, I'm gonna run over to my friend's house for a little bit. And I was telling her about this relationship and she said, Sarah, have you said goodnight to him? And the color drained out of my face and I realized, yes, I just wished him goodnight like 15 minutes ago. And she's like, oh, that's a bad sign. And she said, you need to end it and you need to tell your husband. And I'm like, what are you talking about? None of these things. This isn't a big deal.

This is so not a big deal. And I told her, I don't think I can do that. And she's like, well, if you don't do that, this will just keep happening where you will find yourself drawn to someone else who is saying all the right things, but is the wrong person. And so I did, I told my husband what was happening and we had kind of a fight about it. He felt bad and then we continued on with our regular life. So after nine years of being married to Brandon, we had three children. We'd had four miscarriages.

We had three dogs. We had bought a house together. We had sold a house together.

We had refinished a house together. We had invested so much of ourselves into our shared life. And we had, on top of all of that, decided to change our diets. And suddenly I was feeling fit and fine and healthy and not pregnant.

For the first time in nine years, I was myself. And this created other attention that I didn't anticipate from other people besides my husband. So at one evening event, I was having a great conversation with my colleague and he was starting to go through a divorce or thinking about getting a divorce. And I just felt really bad for him because my marriage was great and I didn't want them to separate. And so I found myself having to make a conscious choice, whether to destroy my life or preserve my life. I never, and air quote, I never did anything.

Nothing ever happened. But the emotional energy and the mental energy of washing my daughter's hair in the tub and only thinking about whether he was going to text me that night or whether he was going to send me an email that said something inappropriate in it. And how would I handle that? It came to another head and there was another moment where I was in the car with my colleague and he was started rubbing my back and we were in my driveway. My husband wasn't home. My children weren't home and it was time for me to get out of the car.

Here's that intersection. Here's the opportunity. Either you destroy your relationship with your the rest of your life or you get out of the car. And I felt this. I heard this voice say, Sarah, get out of the car now. And it was not audible obviously, but I heard it and I said, I have to get out of this car. So I swung the door open. I said, good night. Thank you for bringing me home and slammed the door and walked into the house.

And as I walked through the door, the light from his headlights scanned across my wedding picture that was hanging on the wall. And I felt this weight lift off of me like freedom. You are no longer enslaved by this thing. You don't have like, you don't have to resist this anymore. It's done. It's over.

This will never be a thing again. And I felt strong and ready to face whatever was going to come next with my husband, which ended up being doing a lot of confessing and having a lot of conversations where we're standing in the middle of the kitchen together, holding each other, crying. I'm apologizing. It's like, I forgive you for whatever it is that you feel like you need to be forgiven for. And that's the man that I married.

And that's the foundation that carried us through into healing, into rebuilding trust and into being able to confide in each other about everything. To celebrate our 10th anniversary, we headed out of town for one of Brandon's work weekends. Right before heading out to dinner, he said, I have something for you that I think you should wear to dinner. And I felt embarrassed about this because it's been 10 years and I love my wedding ring.

It's pretty. I'm over the receipt. We're fine now, you know, and this investment in a real diamond ring and a real engagement ring felt extravagant. And so Brandon opened up this case and it was beautiful, absolutely beautiful ring. And then he said, I have something else for you. And handed me an envelope and inside was the lyrics to a song that he had started to write for me.

And I started bawling. It was so touching to me to have him think about what our marriage meant to him and what our relationship was about. It was it far exceeded the price of any engagement ring. The engagement ring ended up being a real bonus course because now I have it on my finger all the time.

But the real gift of having this start of a song that he had composed for me touched me far deeper than any engagement ring could ever have reached. And an excellent job by Greg on the production on the piece and the storytelling editing and a special thanks to Sarah Wells for sharing her story with all of us and her story of her bouts with temptation. And her book is American Honey, A Field Guide to Resisting Temptation.

Go to your local bookstore or wherever you get your books to get it. And there's that critical moment where she says something so important. I was no longer enslaved by this thing. And the enslavement was not her marriage. The marriage gave her freedom. It's the temptation that enslaved her. That's a deep Christian notion, but you don't have to be a Christian who have experienced this notion. The story of a marriage in the end and what saved it.

Sarah Wells's story, her husband's too, here on Our American Stories. Soon millions will make Medicare coverage decisions for next year, and UnitedHealthcare can help you feel confident about your choices. For those eligible, Medicare Annual Enrollment runs from October 15th through December 7th. If you're working past age 65, you might be able to delay Medicare enrollment depending on your employer coverage.

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What up, it's Dramos. You may know me from the recap on LATV. Now I've got my own podcast, Life as a Gringo, coming to you every Tuesday and Thursday. We'll be talking real and unapologetic about all things life, Latin culture, and everything in between from someone who's never quite fit in. Listen to Life as a Gringo on the iHeartRadio app or wherever you get your podcasts. Brought to you by State Farm.

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Whisper: medium.en / 2023-02-15 13:53:49 / 2023-02-15 14:09:33 / 16

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