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The Outsiders: House of Pain Rapper Restores House from Coppola's Movie

Our American Stories / Lee Habeeb
The Truth Network Radio
September 25, 2023 3:01 am

The Outsiders: House of Pain Rapper Restores House from Coppola's Movie

Our American Stories / Lee Habeeb

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September 25, 2023 3:01 am

On this episode of Our American Stories, since being released in 1983, Francis Ford Coppola’s film adaptation of S.E. Hinton’s coming-of-age novel The Outsiders has found continued popularity and has achieved official cult status. And now, in what is surely one of the most interesting pop culture intersections of all time, hip-hop artist Danny Boy O’Connor from the rap group House of Pain—best known for their iconic 1992 anthem “Jump Around”—purchased the Tulsa, Oklahoma home where much of The Outsiders’ film was shot. Here to tell this story is Danny Boy O’Connor himself. 

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My story really begins Los Angeles, California 1983 when I went unknowingly to a movie that I had never heard of, Woodland Hills, California, called The Outsiders with my friend Steve Sokolsky who just happened to read the book. I believe I was in seventh grade and so he was a fan of the book and he wanted to see the movie. He said, Danny, you want to go see a movie with me? And I thought, sure.

Steve Sokolsky, a pretty cool junior high kid that I knew. So I figured, you know, if he likes it, it'd probably be something I like, but I had no idea what we were going to go see. I didn't have any frame of reference. And on that full Saturday afternoon, we went in and saw the movie and I came out a changed man. And people ask me all the time, what was my fascination with The Outsiders? And the movie kind of hit me at a time where I definitely felt out of place in, you know, the San Fernando Valley in the 80s, being a native New Yorker who was moved to California at the age of six and kind of always had like a strong connection to the East Coast.

So Southern California in the 80s looked a lot different than New York City did. And I don't know, I just always felt, you know, separate and apart from and I got that from the movie as well. And I grew up, my father went to prison when I was two months old. We moved in with my grandparents.

My mother worked nights at the Chase Manhattan Bank. And so I never really had that foundation or that family, you know, support or love. And, you know, I carry that with me, even though, you know, I've had a pretty extraordinary life. You know, that foundation from the beginning has always felt unstable. And so when I went to see The Outsiders, the first thing I noticed was that they were a fractured family, a broken family. And that, you know, they were a broken family. And that, despite that, that they stuck together and had each other's backs.

And I felt at a 13 or 14 year old's mindset was that if I could just find that kind of friendship out in the world, that maybe I wouldn't feel so bad about my home life and the way we grew up. And so that was the original hook for me for that movie. Matt Dillon was the coolest dude on the planet at that time. The cast was incredible, whether it's Patrick Swayze, Ralph Macchio, Tom Cruise, Darren Dalton, C. Thomas Owl, Diane Lane. They were all, you know, this was the first time I was really seeing them. Actually, Leaf Garrett was the big star in my mind, looking back, because he was a 70s star. And so really was the only notable name that I knew prior to The Outsiders then, Matt Dillon. But that being said, you know, the movie was the coolest thing I'd ever seen.

And it stuck with me. I immediately went home and then dug out a denim jacket that I may have had from the 70s in New York and kind of adapted that Dallas, Winston, Matt Dillon swagger for the next few years. But as fate would have it, I didn't really have much of a game plan coming out of high school. I dropped out in ninth grade. I hung out for the next three years at high school.

Never really went in too much. Got in a little bit of trouble with the law. And during the time when most of my friends were graduating high school and heading off to college or embarking on a career, I had no idea what I was going to do. And so I connected, reconnected with a high school friend who had had a record out prior to me and him reconnecting. And we started a band called House of Pain. And at the time in hip hop, there wasn't anything on the landscape like it. We were really, you know, kind of the next wave of hip hop in the early 90s. But at that time, there wasn't any really, there wasn't really any hard white boys. And we were like Irish American, tough white kids. And that was our shtick. And our deal was that we were the kind of like boom bap, punch you in your face type of hip hop that was missing. As the 80s turned into the 90s and grunge was a thing, hip hop needed to reinvent. So us and Cypress Hill were kind of like the next face of that in that moment. And so I was very successful with that and sold a few million records and traveled all over the world and made a million bucks.

But I like to say what goes up must come down. And it wasn't only, you know, five years later that I was back to where I started even less, because, you know, doing music for a living, especially as a creative director and an artist more than I am a musician, it kind of left me empty handed when the career was done or the music career was done in that moment. And I really had no other life skills. And I unfortunately turned to drugs to deal with that pain. So I spent the next, you know, five to six years high on methamphetamines and drinking around the clock. And it wasn't until about year 2000 that I got sober. I stayed sober for about three and a half years. And, you know, first year was good. Second year, I started getting complacent.

And a little of my attitude started to come back and my expectations started to come back. At around three and three and a half years, I decided to have a drink and it was pretty much the worst decision I'd ever made. It took me one week to go back on drugs and took me three years to make it back to the 12-step program. And it wasn't until 2005 that I was able to draw another sober breath.

And in 2005 is when I began to put another group together called La Coconostra. And it was on that fateful tour that brought me to Tulsa, Oklahoma. So when we got to Tulsa, Oklahoma, we were stuck here for three days.

And when I say stuck, I mean stuck. But day two of the three days that we were here, we began to get extremely bored. And so I called down to the concierge desk in the lobby and asked them to call us a cab. They laughed.

There was no such thing as cabs. They were able to wrangle us up a guy in a van that took about an hour and a half to get to the hotel. And then when he got there, we asked him, can he take us on a proper tour of Tulsa, which he proceeded to say yes, and then took us to the Woodland Hills Mall.

And I can assure you that didn't go over so well with a bunch of 40-year-olds going to what was at that point pretty, you know, the mall was kind of shuttered as well. And so we went there for about an hour. And as we were heading back to downtown Tulsa, it occurred to me, Tulsa, Tulsa, Tulsa, why does Tulsa sound familiar to me?

And it was at that moment I had the epiphany. And I said, excuse me, driver. And he said, yes.

I said, was the outsiders filmed here? And he almost like locked up the brakes. He was like, turned around. He said, yes, absolutely. He says, why? Do you know it? I said, I not only know it, I love it.

Do you know where any of the filming locations are? And he said, I do know where the driving is. So we proceeded to drop off the rest of the group.

I grabbed my road manager, said you're coming with me. I grabbed my laptop. And at the time, even in 2009, there wasn't much on the internet to go on.

And it's not like today. 2009, I looked up for locations for the outsiders. And I found a Flickr account or two. And I found a site called Tulsa TV Memories, which had a few of the locations. And the addresses were given up.

The address I was most interested in was the outsider's house, which was not given on that website. But they did tell us where the drive-in was. And it did tell me where the park in the movie was, the Crutchfield neighborhood.

And so we went to the drive-in. And I couldn't imagine that this thing was going to look anything like it did in the movie. But not only was it, they felt like it hadn't changed a bit.

And my mind just started to just melt, really, because it looked exactly like it would have in 1982 when they were filming, and exactly like it did in the 60s when they were trying to describe it. So it was pretty good stuff. Anyway, so yeah, we got that driver to take us around Tulsa. We were able to find the drive-in. We were able to find Crutchfield Park, which was the park that Johnny stabs the Socs in.

And they had the confrontation with the Socs in. And then by finding the bark, I was able to find the house. And by finding the house, this is where my life starts to take a different turn.

And when we come back, we'll continue with the story of Danny Boy O'Connor from the rap group House of Pain, his journey back into his life, the movie The Outsiders, filmed in this town, Tulsa in Oklahoma. The rest of this story continues here on Our American Stories. For each person living with myasthenia gravis or MG, their journey with this rare neuromuscular condition is unique. That's why Untold Stories Life with myasthenia gravis, a new podcast from iHeartRadio in partnership with Argenix, is exploring the extraordinary challenges and personal triumphs of underserved communities living with MG. Host Martine Hackett will share powerful perspectives from people living with the debilitating muscle weakness and fatigue caused by this rare disorder. Each episode will uncover the reality of life with myasthenia gravis. From early signs and symptoms to obtaining an accurate diagnosis and finding care, every person with MG has a story to tell. And by featuring these real-life experiences, this podcast hopes to inspire the MG community, educate others about this rare condition, and let those living with it know that they are not alone.

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No father, a hole he's trying to fill because of that. Sees this movie, sees this character in The Outsiders, played by Matt Dillon, of all people. And the next thing you know, a little bit later, he's in a big hit band, House of Pain, and then drugs. And then one day, there's a stop in Tulsa, Oklahoma, where The Outsiders was filmed. And the next thing you know, there he is in front of the house where that movie was filmed.

Let's pick up where we last left off. At the time, it was for sale for $40,000. I can assure you, you can't buy anything in Los Angeles, California, with the word real attached to it for $40,000. I could not believe that this house, one, would be for sale, two, would be $40,000, and three, that nobody understood its true value as an American classic and really a sacred hallowed grounds. That being said, I knew that I was in no position to buy a house in Tulsa, Oklahoma, living in Beverly Hills, California, and that I should just kind of take a photo and soak it all in while I was here and keep moving.

So that's exactly what I did. I took a photo out front. We played Kane's Ballroom the next night. And I also found out that there was a hole in the wall that Sid Vicious had punched in 1978 when the Sex Pistols played Kane's Ballroom. And I put both of those photos on Facebook, which was pretty much a new thing as well. And the response I got was incredible. And in particular, everybody was fascinated with The Outsiders and that the house was not only one still on earth, but they couldn't believe that it was still on the Warner Brothers lot, which I had to correct a lot of people that it is no, it is not on the Warner Brothers lot in Burbank. It is actually still here in North Tulsa. And I made sure I did not tell anybody that it was for sale because I didn't want anybody else buying it, never again thinking that I would end up buying it five years later.

But that's exactly what happened. So after finding the house, we kind of, I realized that there's some real cool stuff across America. And so it really started here for me, but the, I started to urban explore and I put a group together called the Delta Bravo Urban Exploration Team. And what that is, is it's a page I started on Facebook and I put The Outsiders House first and I put a before and after photo, told people the basics, you know, The Outsiders 1982, here's the house that the Curtis Brothers lived.

Here's the address 731 North St. Louis Avenue. And here's a before and after photo. And I found a lot of support and made a lot of friends through this web page that we started. And I found that there was a lot of like-minded people all over the world, but here in particular in the US that were at a certain age where they were like really looking back fondly on all of the pop culture locations and all of our collective history, which is really pop history.

I mean, I was, if I'm honest, I was raised by a television set and the radio. I mean, this is where I got most of the stuff I was after, you know, as a kid, this is where all my information came from. So in 2009, I used the tour bus as my personal like pop culture location vehicle. And I figured if I'm going to be on this tour bus and everybody else is going to be, you know, doing their thing, I'm going to get highly caffeinated, walk around every city we go to, and I'm going to look for culturally relevant undiscovered locations.

And so that was the birth of the Delta Bravo urban exploration team. Again, it just was like a cool hobby that I could do in my sobriety that really cost me nothing. And I was also able to kind of like see all the undiscovered locations that I had always wanted to see, like where Mary Tyler Moore's house was in Minneapolis, where the Son of Sam was arrested in Brooklyn, and stuff like this. And because of the success of that on the internet, I got so much, you know, so many accolades and met so many cool people, we started to do it like, pretty, we took it pretty serious for a while, we were actually getting courted by a lot of companies in Hollywood, they were trying to turn it into a television show.

It never really kind of worked out television wise, but the group kept growing and growing. So we started to go on group trips. And meanwhile, I was still touring a lot.

So I was going back and forth across the US. And year after year, a minimum of twice a year, but sometimes three or four times a year, I would come back, whether on purpose or not, to Tulsa, Oklahoma, and I'd always make a mission or pilgrimage to see the outsider's house and mostly some of the other locations as well. And what I started to notice is that year after year, this house was starting to deteriorate, and that the neighborhood was starting to fall apart. And that the Habitat for Humanity was coming through here, and they were clearing out a lot of these these streets and these houses, building new houses.

I always like to qualify that I am a fan of the Habitat for Humanities and what they do, in particular, making low income houses, you know, affordable to people who wouldn't be able to afford those. And that being said, I was worried that nobody recognized this house for really what it was, which was an American classic and a cinematic masterpiece, you know, part of a bigger, you know, picture. And so at year five is when I got here and started to get worried. I started to think, well, what if they tear this house down? And what if nobody recognizes that what this thing really represents and what it is?

And it's on the fifth year when I started to ask myself the question, well, why don't you do something about it? And really, I have no expertise on any of this stuff. I was just a fan who couldn't imagine the world without the Outsider's House. There was really never a plan or a blueprint or any of that.

But what I did was meet a couple people here in Tulsa, Oklahoma. They not only saw the vision that I had that this should be some kind of like, one, it shouldn't ever be torn down. Two, maybe it could be restored and it could be somebody's house. And we could put a little display or some homage to the movie that was filmed here in one of the rooms.

And the idea just kept getting bigger and bigger. But what ends up happening is we end up getting the contact information for the owner who, her husband bought the house five years before I got here. And they basically did a quick fluff and buff in hopes to use it as a rental property. Unfortunately, her husband died.

He gives it to her in the will. And her and her sister moved to Florida because they were not native to Tulsa. And they've had no reason to stay here once her husband was gone. I guess they were kind of like absentee landlords. I mean, they were they were trying their best to collect the rent, but the tenants weren't paying. They were eight months behind in their rent.

The house was in terrible condition. And so by the time I found her in 2009, she was ready to sell. We called her. She told us she wouldn't take a penny less than $20,000.

My buddy made the call. So he said he wouldn't give her a penny more than $15,000, to which she accepted. And at that point, I thought, man, we robbed this lady. I mean, we bought an American treasure for $15,000. I mean, where on earth can you buy a house for $15,000, much less the house from the movie The Outsiders? So yeah, so I buy the house for $15,000.

I buy it sight unseen. I'd never been in the house. I had peeked in it a few times. I'd been on the outside of the outsider's house a few times, but never really knowing the true condition of the house and also never understanding. When it comes to remodeling homes or anything that has anything to do with that, I have no idea what I'm doing.

So this is not something that I would have been predisposed to do or something that would have been a likely thing for me to do. I was just a passionate fan who couldn't imagine if they tore this house down what the world would be like without it. And so I ended up giving the tenants little by little over a month to move them out because, again, they were eight months behind in rent. And it cost me $4,800 to get them out.

When I finally drove here a month later from California to see my new house, I ended up breaking in the back window because they did not leave me keys. And I realized that this was the worst mistake I had ever made. And you just heard it from him, the biggest mistake he'd ever made, was it? Well, we're going to find out the rest of the story in a minute. But what a story it's been so far. He was raised on TV in a tour bus.

And for $15,000, he thought he just bought a piece of the American dream and certainly an American treasure. What happens next? Danny Boy O'Connor's story continues here on Our American Stories. For each person living with myasthenia gravis, or MG, their journey with this rare neuromuscular condition is unique. That's why Untold Stories Life with myasthenia gravis, a new podcast from iHeartRadio in partnership with Argenics, is exploring the extraordinary challenges and personal triumphs of underserved communities living with MG. Host Martine Hackett will share powerful perspectives from people living with the debilitating muscle weakness and fatigue caused by this rare disorder. Each episode will uncover the reality of life with myasthenia gravis, from early signs and symptoms to obtaining an accurate diagnosis and finding care. Every person with MG has a story to tell. And by featuring these real life experiences, this podcast hopes to inspire the MG community, educate others about this rare condition, and let those living with it know that they are not alone.

Listen to Untold Stories Life with myasthenia gravis on the iHeartRadio app, Apple podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. Nissan's electric vehicles run on a special electricity, not the electricity that turns on light bulbs or runs to your outlets. Think about it. What's that rush that gets you excited and creative sparks fly? I'm talking that spine tingling goosebumps feeling that electrifies your body and soul. It could be the simple win of leaving on time for your morning commute, locking eyes with your crush, or scoring the largest deal of your career. But really is pushing new ideas forward and being fearless, believing that you can achieve anything you set your mind to. Even though it may be uneasy, the journey ahead will produce great results.

And that's the most thrilling ride, empowering yourself to embrace any new adventure that comes your way. And you can get that same electrifying feeling when driving a Nissan. Nissan is ever evolving and changing the game through electric vehicle innovation. Because the electricity their cars generate not only moves engines, but it also moves the emotions of those who drive them.

To learn more about Nissan's electric vehicle lineup, visit www.NissanUSA.com. Hey there, check out this news from Boost Infinite. You can now get the latest iPhone every year and unlimited wireless for just $60 a month. This includes the new iPhone 15 Pro.

Now, just think about that. You get the latest iPhone, not just this year, every year. The earth goes round the sun, you get the latest iPhone and unlimited wireless from Boost Infinite and free candy.

No, no free candy. But you know those people who always have the latest tech gizmo before everyone else? Now you could be one of those people without even trying. And when people ask you, is that the latest iPhone? You could just be all cool about it and say, Oh, yeah, I mean, I get the latest one every year.

You know, that's just how I roll. That can be you with Boost Infinite, infinitely better. To learn more, visit BoostInfinite.com. That's BoostInfinite.com.

Terms apply after 30 gigabytes service may be slowed receive a comparable iPhone model each year with an acceptable trade in every year requires credit qualification and 36 month phone financing agreement. On Heart of the Game, we're talking with some of the most successful families in sports to learn what's really making them tick from staying healthy to fostering strong family cause. We'll hear from athletes such as Kurt Warner on what lessons are being passed down to a new generation of athletes. There is a level when we play that we feel we're invincible, you feel like it's not going to happen to you. But then anytime it does, whether it's you suffering an injury or teammates suffering a traumatic injury, that's what stops you in your tracks. And it makes you go, okay, we're not invincible. And it becomes more emotional.

It's a part of the process to have to work through those things, you know, and understand the risks that go into it and understand the rewards or the love for the sport. Listen to Heart of the Game every Thursday on the iHeartRadio app, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. I'm Jonathan Strickland, host of the podcast tech stuff. I sat down with Sunun Shahani of Surfare Mobility, which recently went public. We talked about flying in electric planes and regional air mobility. The future of travel doesn't have to include crowded airports, cramped seats or long road trips. It can be as simple as using an app to book a short range flight on an electric plane.

Learn more on tech stuff on the iHeartRadio app, Apple Podcasts, or wherever you get your podcasts. And we continue with our American stories and Danny Boy O'Connor's story. He had just laid down 15 grand on a house in Tulsa, Oklahoma, a house where the outsiders, his favorite film, the film that had more influence on his life than any other.

And we all have that film or that book or that song. Let's return to Danny Boy's story in Tulsa. Clearly, the owner knew a lot better than I did the condition of the house. If there was any worry of me underpaying for this house, it was quickly erased when I got in here. I mean, this house was in shambles. The only thing this house needed was a brand new house and it was in terrible condition.

And then the fact was it didn't look like it had been cleaned up in the last hundred years. They were hoarding in here and it was in terrible condition and I panicked. And at that point I thought, well, basically I just flushed $20,000 of my $28,000 life savings down the drain. I had no work in the foreseeable future for me.

We weren't touring at that time. And so my next thought was like, look it, I'm going to ask for help. And I often say, you know, I'm a six foot six alpha male and it's hard to ask for help when people assume that you should be able to do this type of work.

But the truth is I don't know how to do this type of work. And it was very, it was very humbling and I had to really humble myself to admit that I didn't know what I was doing and I was in over my head and that perhaps if there were a few other Outsiders fans on earth like me, maybe they could help me find a way to turn this into a museum to help pitch in whether that was a gift in kind or some cash or whatever. And so we put a GoFundMe together and we started to raise a little money and immediately the press got a hold of the story.

And if I thought I was one of few Outsiders fans on this planet, it didn't take long for me to figure out that I was clearly wrong on that. I mean, immediately the city council showed up to the house, the mayor of Tulsa showed up to the house, the press came out of the woodworks and it just kept growing and growing and growing and before long, you know, here we were on our way to turning this thing into a museum. Now, at first I want to tell you it was going to be a movie museum because I had read the book but it was only a few years prior that I read the book. But this book again is, it is an American classic. It was written by a 15 year old girl here in Tulsa, Oklahoma by the name of Susan L. Louise Hinton. The book is 51 years old now, it has never been out of print. At the time when Susie got her publishing deal, they agreed with the publishers that it'd be best if nobody understood that she was a female, so they called her S.E.

Hinton to be ambiguous with that. She was failing out of English when she wrote it and got a D plus in creative writing and I think that's incredible because the hope is there, you know, for everybody that great things can happen despite maybe a few bad marks in a few classes. And really the book is what brings most people to the house. People love the movie without a doubt and that movie, you know, basically launched the Brat Pack which is all the actors we've mentioned before, you know, Tom Cruise, Patrick Swayze, Matt Dillon, Ralph Macchio, C. Thomas Howell, Diane Lane, directed by Francis Ford Coppola. The book seems to have way more of a draw or is equal if not bigger draw than the movie and that was learning experience for me as well because on an average day, people come by this house all the time to stop by and it's usually, you know, a 50 year old, a 40 year old, two 17 year olds and a 12 year old and it's usually, somebody's going to seventh grade and it's required reading. Their older brother and sister read it five years ago when they were in seventh grade.

Their parents remember reading it when they got to junior high and they also were there to see the movie or saw it on HBO when they were kids and it's really the whole family tree that comes to enjoy this whole story from the book to the movie and now I'm told it's being turned into a Broadway musical which is also incredible. So much stuff has transpired since that first day of me buying the house but what ended up happening is that the whole community kind of just puts this thing on their back and runs with it. Plumbers came by and helped me plumb, roofers roofed, gardeners gardened, tile layers tiled and contractors contracted and everybody just started to do what they could do and it looked like, you know, people would say, hey listen, on Sunday after my daughter's soccer practice I can come by and work for two hours for free if you don't mind and I said yeah, it would be fantastic and so really, this is a communal project, you know, I get thanked everywhere I go around town and around Oklahoma for, you know, saving the outsider's house but I feel disingenuous by accepting that praise and I always tell them and I think they think I'm being, you know, humble or being, you know, coy or whatever but the truth is that this thing happens because everybody pitched in and helped and it was usually the people with the least to give given the most. That being said, our number one supporter cash wise is the author, Essie Hinton herself and Jack White also, you know, came by and told me he loved what we were doing and loved the book, he loves the movie and loves Tulsa and he got us over the hump.

We were stuck at $45,000 on our GoFundMe and we were looking for $75,000 and he said I want to give you $30,000 from last night's show and get you over the hump which he did that and changed everything. I mean, we were kind of, we were, what I thought would take six to eight months to complete took us three years. Two months ago we finally were able to cut the ribbon. In between those last three years we've done three events to support the house.

We're both Ralph Macchio, C. Thomas Howe, Darren Dalton, all of them in the movie had come back one or two to three different times for three different events to support this and really what I found out is this thing has become like a community center and had a really good trickle down effect. I mean, when I got here the lawn was to my waist and trash all over the place. We cut the lawn, got it down to size, we removed all the debris, we cut down trees that had fallen in upon themselves and we basically cleaned this house up so nice that everybody else in the neighborhood started to get the drift and they started to clean their stuff up and before long it changed the face of the neighborhood as well and so if you come here in North Tulsa on the corner of Independent and St. Louis you'll definitely, you'll see what I'm talking about and it's a sight to behold. There's a lot of, there's just so many different layers to this thing. I would have been bored a long time ago if it was just a house from a movie and as much as I love the film and love the book, there's so much more greater at work here.

I love Tulsa, Oklahoma. I love that a 15 year old girl wrote this while she was failing out of English and got a D plus in creative writing was really going through a rough patch and she wrote this masterpiece and this masterpiece is different than all others because it literally is the book that starts the young adult category. It was the first time that a young adult ever wrote about being a young adult for young adults and if I'm not mistaken that is the most successful category of books now on the market. For me it's changed my life. I spent the first, let's call it the first 45 years of my life trying to build my career and promote my brand and stay relevant in that way and finally it was a breath of fresh air to discover that this thing could use somebody to champion it and instead of championing the fragments of my shattered career or whatever in music that I was able to parlay all that experience that I thought was of no use in the end and kind of pivot out and put it into Susie's legacy and in particular saving the Outsider's House and by taking this on it's opened my world to a whole bunch of other areas.

We're looking to do weddings here. We bring school children through on Monday through Friday so schools will read this at 7th grade. They will go to the Circle Cinema which was also a historic movie theater here that's 91 years old on the original Route 66 and it was also featured in the movie. They show that movie to those 7th graders and then the 7th graders come here dressed as greasers and sewers and they get to experience the house, the museum and I know that they get truly inspired because they don't have a lot of role models to look at and to say hey this person is from my school or my city or my town and they've become successful and they're legends and make no mistake, S.E.

Hinton is their, that's their legend, that's their mentor. They look and they go this little girl did this here and it gives them hope and so for me I found a whole new purpose here in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I live here now full-time. I moved from Beverly Hills and I've been here for two years and it only gets better for me. This town has changed tremendously in the last 10 years for the better. There's a ton of cool things here between Route 66 and Cane's Ballroom and the Driller's Baseball Stadium where the Dodger's AA team plays. There's good food, good people and affordable gas. What more can you want?

You can buy a beautiful home here for $150,000 which tell me where else you can do that. So I'm Danny O'Connor. I'm the owner of the Outsider's House but I am the executive director of the Outsider's House Museum and yeah this is my American story. And what a story. Thanks to Danny Boyer O'Connor for telling it and thanks to Greg Hengler for putting this together.

By the way, make sure to go to TheOutsidersHouse.com to learn more. Take a visit if you're driving across the Midwest. Stop in Tulsa. He took a stop in Tulsa all right and he called it his home. Danny Boyer O'Connor's story of finding home.

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Whisper: medium.en / 2023-10-03 11:59:45 / 2023-10-03 12:17:29 / 18

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