Share This Episode
Our American Stories Lee Habeeb Logo

Saving Monticello: One Family's Struggle to Make Sure History was Remembered

Our American Stories / Lee Habeeb
The Truth Network Radio
November 2, 2022 3:01 am

Saving Monticello: One Family's Struggle to Make Sure History was Remembered

Our American Stories / Lee Habeeb

On-Demand Podcasts NEW!

This broadcaster has 2131 podcast archives available on-demand.

Broadcaster's Links

Keep up-to-date with this broadcaster on social media and their website.


November 2, 2022 3:01 am

On this episode of Our American Stories, Thomas Jefferson’s impact on our country cannot be overstated. He fought for religious liberty, states rights, and the expansion and strengthening of America as a up-and-coming nation. His legacy is memorialized in many locations across the country, not the least of which his own residence in Charlottesville, Virginia… Monticello.

Support the show (https://www.ouramericanstories.com/donate)

See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE
Our American Stories
Lee Habeeb
Our American Stories
Lee Habeeb

Do you want to win two tickets to the FIFA World Cup 2022 in Qatar? Frito-Lay is giving you the chance to make history by joining their Pass the Ball challenge. Add your picture to the Golden World Soccer Ball, then pass the ball to fellow fans to score additional entries. Scan the QR code on specially marked bags of Lay's, Cheetos, or Doritos, or visit fritoleyscore.com and pass the ball now. No purchase necessary. Open to legal residents of the USDC 18-plus grand prize entry deadline 11-10-22.

Entries received after 11-10-22 are only eligible for secondary prizes. See rules at fritoleyscore.com. Cozy up to a cup of Starbucks caramel brulee latte with cream, crunchy caramel brulee toppings, steamed milk, and espresso. Just bring your own comfy sweater.

Find your cheer on the Starbucks app today. Everything is more expensive these days. With inflation rising, Medicare beneficiaries living on a fixed income are concerned about increasing costs. Make your Medicare dollars go further by picking the right plan. Start by looking for a plan that gives you more. For example, many Medicare Advantage plans include dental, vision, and hearing benefits. While original Medicare doesn't, learn more about plan costs beyond premiums such as deductibles, co-pays, and drug coverage. Find that right plan for you.

Visit UHCMedicareHealthPlans.com. And we're back with our American stories. Thomas Jefferson's impact on our country cannot be overstated. He fought for religious liberty, states' rights, and expanded this country with a Louisiana Purchase. His legacy is memorialized in many locations across the country, not the least of which is his own residence in Charlottesville, Virginia, Monticello. Mark Leipson brings us the story of one family's fight to honor Jefferson with the preservation of this historic structure. Well, this story has several aspects to it. And at its heart, it's a story of historic preservation. It's a story of Thomas Jefferson. It's a story of architecture, Monticello, the history of Monticello.

And it's a Jewish American history story, which we'll see as we get into it. It starts on one of the most amazing days in American history. And that was the day that Thomas Jefferson died.

And I think you probably know what day that was. July 4th, 1826. On that day, up on the mountain at Monticello, Thomas Jefferson died about one o'clock in the afternoon. And then a few hours later, at his farm up in Massachusetts, John Adams died. Our second and third presidents died on the 50th anniversary of the republic that they were so instrumental in founding. And, you know, people reacted. I mean, they didn't have CNN back then, but people found out soon enough, sometimes in apocalyptic terms. I mean, John Quincy Adams wrote in his diary that these two men dying on this day was a visible and palpable manifestation of divine intervention.

Now, whether it was divine intervention or not, I'd like you to know one other thing about July 4th, 1826, and Thomas Jefferson. When he died, he was over $107,000 in debt. Now, that's a lot of money today, but it was a small fortune back in 1826.

We're talking about at least $2 million. So the family was stuck with a $2 million debt. And who was the family? Who inherited? Well, first, it was Thomas Jefferson's daughter, Martha Jefferson Randolph. Remember, Jefferson's wife, Martha, had died. And Martha, his oldest of two daughters, served many of the roles that his wife would be as hostess and so on. And then her son and Thomas Jefferson's favorite grandson, Thomas Jefferson Randolph.

So Jeff Randolph, as he was known, and Martha were from the Randolphs of Virginia, you know, one of Virginia's first families. But they were land rich and cash poor, and they didn't know what to do, being saddled with this gigantic debt. So one of the things they did was the year after he died, in January 1827, they held what they called an executor's sale up on the mountaintop, in which they auctioned off Thomas Jefferson's possessions. Well, that sale took place. We don't know exactly how much it brought in, but we do know that it didn't do much to whittle down that large debt. So reluctantly, the Randolphs decided they would have to sell Monticello. And, you know, it didn't sell.

It didn't sell for five years, and it doesn't sort of compute in the 21st century. Monticello is, you know, an icon of American and world architecture. Monticello is a UNESCO world heritage site. You know, it's the only residence listed as the UNESCO world. You know, what are world heritage sites? Well, the Taj Mahal, the Grand Canyon, and things like that.

You know, if you have a nickel in your pocket, I know people don't have carry change that much these days, but if you do have a nickel, look on the back. There's an image of Monticello. Some people have liked to go up to Monticello, hold up a nickel in front of one of the entrances, and we can see the nickel view of Monticello.

And it is a gorgeous spot. I mean, it's almost impossible to take a bad picture of Monticello standing as it is on this beautiful little mountain in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia. So why did it take four and then almost five years for the Randolphs to sell Monticello? Well, Thomas Jefferson had some interesting ideas about architecture.

They weren't very common in early 19th century America. For instance, he was the first person to put a dome on a residence. You know that Monticello has a dome on it. You know, it was one of the first architecturally designed houses in the United States.

It had that dome. There is no giant staircase. You know, if you go into the entrance hall at Monticello, look around. There is no giant staircase like was common in large mansions of this type. There are two small doors on two sides of the entrance hall where you go upstairs. And in fact, Thomas Jefferson didn't really care about the upstairs. They were just mostly plain bedrooms up there for his grandchildren who lived with him. And you know, Jefferson didn't really believe in bedrooms, right?

On the first floor is his bed chamber, which is basically a bed in an alcove between his cabinet, which is his office, and the library. And it was on the top of a mount, right? I mean, most of the plantations of the day were built down along on flat ground, usually near rivers for transportation's sake. And you know, those roads were not paid. It's about a mile road up the mountain to Monticello.

And it was very difficult to bring whatever, including water, food, supplies up and down the mountain. So it finally did sell in 18. By the way, the Randolphs also sold off acreage. So Monticello and its surrounding properties, Jefferson inherited about 5,000 acres from his father, Peter Jefferson.

It was down to about 552 acres. And the Randolph sold Monticello to a man named James Turner Barkley, who bought it for $7,000. Plus, he traded a house in Charlottesville.

We don't have time to talk about James Turner Barkley today, except to say that he was kind of eccentric. He was a medical doctor. He was a pharmacist. But he thought he could go up there at Monticello and do make a silkworm business. So along mulberry row, he planted mulberry trees.

The silkworm business didn't work. You know, it appears as though he almost destroyed the 18 acre grove, what Jefferson called an ornamental forest. And we do know that he did not take care of the place. A visitor who came in 1834 wrote back that all is in dilapidation and ruin.

So how did Monticello get to be in dilapidation and ruin by 1834? Thomas Jefferson, you name a field of endeavor. He was a true Renaissance man.

I mean, architecture, archaeology, of course, philosophy. You know, he had the largest private library in the United States before he had to sell it to raise money. He sold it to the United States after the War of 1812, when the British burned the congressional library. You know, he spoke seven languages because he was president, vice president, secretary of state, governor of Virginia. He wrote the Virginia Declaration of Religious Freedom. And, you know, I always illustrate it by that great quote that President Kennedy once said when he had a dinner at the White House for Nobel laureates. And he said, this is the most extraordinary collection of talent, human knowledge that has been gathered at the White House with a possible exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone.

Jefferson had all these talents, but he was not good at business for whatever reason. You know, he inherited all these farms. He bought natural bridge. It's in Virginia.

It's a beautiful natural formation of rock. He thought he could make it into tourist attraction. You know, he bought it from the King of England, you know, during colonial days, but it never made a dime. He owned mills on the river down near the Rivanna River.

They just leaked money. He had bad luck with his agriculture. All those farms, you know, it's like when the crops were good, prices were low. When the crops were bad, prices were high. He tried famously to grow grapes up there, start a wine business.

That never worked. You know, he loved to spend money, bought the finest furniture and furnishings from all over the world, New York, Boston, London, Paris, and that place was just filled with beautiful furniture and furnishings. And you're listening to Mark Leipson tell a heck of a story about not just a building, but a man, a man who well did almost everything well except hold onto money. He spent more than he had.

And in the end, one of the world's worst businessmen, but one of our great, great, great minds and the architect in essence of much of what we hold dear today, when we come back, more of the story of how Monticello was saved here on Our American Stories. It's giving you the chance to win two tickets to the FIFA World Cup 2022 Final by joining their Pass the Ball Challenge. Just grab a specially marked bag of Lays, Cheetos, or Doritos, scan the QR code and enter for a chance to win. But if you want more entries, you gotta pass the ball, the Golden World Soccer Ball, that is. The first people to add their picture to the Golden Ball will receive a one of a kind collectible NFT commemorating the experience. And as you pass the ball to fellow soccer fans, you get more entries, plus custom swag and awesome prizes.

Scan the QR code on specially marked bags of Lays, Cheetos, or Doritos, or visit FritoLayScore.com to pass the ball now. When the world gets in the way of your music, try the new Bose QuietComfort Earbuds 2, next gen earbuds uniquely tuned to the shape of your ears. They use exclusive Bose technology that personalizes the audio performance to fit you, delivering the world's best noise cancellation and powerfully immersive sound, so you can hear and feel every detail of the music you love. Bose QuietComfort Earbuds 2, sound shape to you.

To learn more, visit Bose.com. Doing household chores can be very time-consuming and tedious, and there's nothing more daunting than facing piles of laundry that need to be done. I mean, that can be overwhelming, and that was my last night, and it's pretty much my every other night. If you want to get those larger laundry loads done and get back to your life, try All Free Clear Mega Packs. All Free Clear Mega Packs are bigger packs with two times the cleaning ingredients compared to a regular pack, so you can tackle any laundry load with confidence.

Now, all I need is a bigger industrial size washer and dryer. All Free Clear Mega Packs are also 100% free of perfumes and dyes and gentle on skin, which is great for any family sensitive skin needs. So the next time that the whole family gets home from a long vacation, or the kids get back from summer camp, or whatever situation that has you staring at a giant pile of dirty clothes, just know that All Free Clear Mega Packs have your back. They have mine between spit up, Dawson learning how to eat, and Jared working at a restaurant. I see those loads all the time.

Today, you can purchase All Free Clear Mega Packs at your local store today and conquer any laundry load. And we're back with Our American Stories and the story of Monticello. We just heard about the disarray that Monticello was in, now owned by James Turner Barkley. It was a shadow of what it had once been, this place of hospitality that Jefferson had made it.

Back to Mark Leapsom with the story. He was also overwhelmed with visitors. People would love to come up to Monticello, as they do now, to see what President Theodore Roosevelt called his essay in architecture. And, you know, some, and they would come, family and friends would come, they would come with servants, they would come with enslaved people. Sometimes it wasn't uncommon to have 20, 30 or more people living there for days, weeks, months at a time sometimes. And so the place with Jefferson, you know, suffering financially, they just didn't have what we would call the money to do preventive maintenance. So James Turner Barkley, he just couldn't take living up there either. Visitors came up and bothered him.

The mulberry business didn't work. So he sold the place in 1834 to a most unlikely buyer. And his name was Uriah Phillips Levy, who was a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy at the time. And he purchased Monticello from James Turner Barkley for 2007.

From James Turner Barkley for $2,700. Now, Barkley had sold off acreage too. It was down to, I think, yeah, 190 acres, 182 acres, something like that. And the place was into appidation and ruin.

And what did Uriah Levy do? Well, he was a man of means. And he repaired, preserved and restored Monticello after he took possession in 1836. And, you know, we have evidence from people who visited that he did really restore the place and preserve it and restore a little preservation and restoration.

We're not in the language. You can make an argument that Uriah Levy was the first American house preservationist. You know, this happened in 1830, starting in 1836. We usually look at Anne Pamela Cunningham, who bought George Washington's Mount Vernon from his heirs after he died and saved it from being divided up and developed.

But this was 20 years before that. So a little bit about Uriah Levy. He was a hero of the U.S. Navy, joined the Navy when he was 20 years old in 1812. He was born in 1792 in Philadelphia. And he was a fifth generation American. He came from one of the most prominent and illustrious Jewish American families, his great, great grandfather. Came over here with a group of 40 Jews in 1733, escaping the Inquisition from Portugal.

Went to London. They arrived in Savannah, Georgia in the summer of 1733, and were among the founders of the city of Savannah, Georgia. His name was Dr. Samuel Neunish. He was the only medical doctor in the colony of Georgia. He helped stem an epidemic probably of smallpox, and he was honored by Governor Oglethorpe of Georgia. He was also a founder of congregation Mikvah Israel in 1733. It's the third oldest Jewish congregation.

It's still there and, of course, not in the original building in downtown Savannah. Jonas Phillips, where the Phillips comes from and Uriah Phillips of you, that was his maternal grandfather. And he came to this country in 1836. A merchant from Germany settled in Philadelphia, got caught up with the Revolutionary War forever, and actually joined a Philadelphia militia unit and fought against the Brits. And he was influential in Uriah Levy, one of his favorite grandchilds, a love of country. His two heroes were John Paul Jones and George Washington growing up at his grandfather's knee, and was one of the reasons that Uriah Levy joined the U.S. Navy and became a naval war hero.

Uriah Levy was born in 1892 in Philadelphia. He always loved the sea, joined the Navy in 1812 to fight in the war, and he was a hero of the War of 1812. He was assistant sailing master on a ship called the Argus, which captured British ships in the Channel, and they captured 25 ships.

And when they went to capture the 26th, the Brits won that battle, killed the captain, and kept the crew imprisoned for the rest of the war, including Uriah Levy. And Uriah Levy came home, went on to have a 50-year career in the U.S. Navy. He died in service in 1862. He was a Commodore. When he died, he was the first Jewish Commodore in the U.S. Navy. So Uriah Levy's naval career was recognized by the Navy. The first Jewish chapel on any naval base at Norfolk, Virginia, opened in 1942, named the Commodore Levy Chapel. It was a destroyer escort named after him in World War II, the USS Uriah P. Levy, which actually took part in the Japanese surrender in the Pacific. And then about 15 years ago, and I think it was 2006, the Commodore Uriah P. Levy Center was dedicated at the U.S.

Naval Academy. So his place in naval history is assured. As far as his owning Monticello, the question is, you know, why did he do it? He never said it, said it out in print that we know.

But we can take an educated guess. One reason is that on his own, in 1833, while he was in Paris, while he was in the Navy, on his own, he commissioned a full-length statue of Thomas Jefferson by one of the top sculptors of the day, David D'Angers. And he donated that statue to the people of the United States, a plaster model.

He donated it to New York City, which is where he lived. Congress got it in 1833 and didn't quite know what to do with it. They finally, it was finally taken to the White House. And if you see old pictures, in the first one, Dawn of Photography in the 1860s, you'll see that statue of Thomas Jefferson on the lawn of the White House, you know, facing Lafayette Park. It was taken inside in the 1870s because it wasn't doing very well outside of front statue.

It was cleaned up. It was first put in a statuary hall on the Capitol. And today it is in the rotunda, the rotunda of the U.S. Capitol.

As you come in one of the entrances, you'll see it on the right. And it's the only privately donated statue in the Capitol. It's, if you look at the plaque, it says donated to people of the United States by U.S. Navy Lieutenant Uriah Phillips Levy. Now, I said earlier that Levy was a man of means. He lived in New York City. And in the 1820s, he invested in rooming houses in a farming village in the city. That was Greenwich Village.

And when the streets were paved and artisans and others moved in there, he made a fortune with his real estate ventures in New York City, which is what allowed him to purchase Monticello to repair, preserve it and restore it. You know, he didn't live there full time. So Uriah Levy died in 1862 in New York City. He was still in service in the Navy. And he left a will in which no one knows exactly what he was thinking when he bequeathed Monticello to the people of the United States to be used as an agricultural school for the orphans of Navy warrant officers. I mean, we don't know if there were any orphans and Navy warrant officers at the time. So Uriah Levy married late in life, didn't have any children, but he had lots of brothers and sisters and nieces and nephews.

There were 64 people who were named in the will and they filed what's called a partition lawsuit against the will. And you're listening to Mark Leipson tell a heck of a story about the man who saved Monticello and in a way about the man who built it too. And the book, by the way, is saving Monticello, the Levy family's epic quest to rescue the house that Jefferson built. And Jefferson built his house in Charlottesville, Virginia, and also built the University of Virginia there too. By the way, up the road is Madison's house and not further up the road is Washington's. There's something special about the contribution of Virginia to the birth of this nation.

When we come back, more of the remarkable story of Monticello is told by Mark Leipson here on Our American Stories. So grab a specially marked bag of leis, cheetos, and Doritos and look for the Golden World Soccer Ball. Explore the ever-growing community, then pass the ball to other soccer fans and play daily games to score additional entries and a chance to win custom swag and awesome prizes. So grab a specially marked bag of leis, cheetos, and Doritos and look for the Golden World Soccer Ball. Explore in a chance to win custom swag and awesome prizes.

So grab a specially marked bag of leis, cheetos, or Doritos or visit fredolayscore.com and pass the ball now for your chance to win two tickets to the FIFA World Cup 2022 final in Qatar. When the world gets in the way of your music, try the new Bose QuietComfort Earbuds 2, next-gen earbuds uniquely tuned to the shape of your ears. They use exclusive Bose technology that personalizes the audio performance to fit you, delivering the world's best noise cancellation and powerfully immersive sound so you can hear and feel every detail of the music you love. Bose QuietComfort Earbuds 2, sound shape to you.

To learn more, visit Bose.com. Doing household chores can be very time consuming and tedious and there's nothing more daunting than facing piles of laundry that need to be done. I mean, that can be overwhelming and that was my last night and it's pretty much my every other night. If you want to get those larger laundry loads done and get back to your life, try All Free Clear Mega Packs. All Free Clear Mega Packs are bigger packs with two times the cleaning ingredients compared to a regular pack so you can tackle any laundry load with confidence.

Now all I need is a bigger industrial size washer and dryer. All Free Clear Mega Packs are also 100% free of perfumes and dyes and gentle on skin which is great for any family sensitive skin needs. So the next time that the whole family gets home from a long vacation or the kids get back from summer camp or whatever the situation that has you staring at a giant pile of dirty clothes, just know that All Free Clear Mega Packs have your back. They have mine between spit up, Dawson learning how to eat and Jared working at a restaurant. I see those loads all the time.

Today you can purchase All Free Clear Mega Packs at your local store today and conquer any laundry load. And we're back with our final segment on the battle to preserve part of Jefferson's legacy, his home Monticello. Uriah Levy, the first Jewish Commodore in the U.S. Navy, owned Monticello but it just passed away in March of 1862. In his will he left Monticello to quote the orphans of naval warrant officers but his nieces, nephews, brothers and other relations weren't thrilled with that and so they took legal action.

Back to Leipson with the conclusion of the story. And the lawsuit was filed in New York where he lived and in Virginia. It took until 1879 for the lawsuits to win their way through the courts of Virginia and New York.

They wound up eventually in the Supreme Courts of both cases and they weren't settled until 1879. Now in the middle, in the middle of that while the while the heirs were fighting over his personal property, the Civil War happened. And you know people often ask did anything happen up at Monticello during the Civil War as far as action?

No. Charlottesville was a crossroads, troops were always going in and out, there was tiny skirmishing that happened but nothing that damaged Monticello. However, during the war the the South confiscated all property owned by Northerners and in November of 1864 the South took possession of Monticello, auctioned off all of Uriah Levy's property including his enslaved people and auctioned off Monticello and it was purchased by a man named Ben Ficklin for something like fifty thousand dollars in Confederate money.

Ficklin was a colonel in the Confederate army. He never lived there but he moved his family up there and this was in November of 64 but in by the time that war ended just six months later in March it went back to the family and the lawsuit dragged on and on and on. This is when Monticello went to its second period of deterioration and we have photographic evidence of what it looked like from the early days of photography in the late 1860s into the 1870s and the place looks worse than dilapidation and ruin. I mean you could see for yourself in these old photographs that windows were broken, the shutters were hanging down, the roof was caving in, the grounds were in terrible, the terraces were rotted away, the grounds were in terrible condition and one reason was that Monticello was under the care of a caretaker who didn't take very good care of it.

His name was Joel Wheeler. He allowed University of Virginia students to have parties there so the place was wrecked. While the lawsuits were finally settled in 1879 when Uriah Levy's nephew whose name was Jefferson Monroe Levy, yes he was named after two presidents, he was the son of Uriah Levy's eccentric brother bought out the other heirs for something like ten thousand five hundred dollars and he took control of Monticello in 1879 and Jefferson Levy did what his uncle did, lived in New York City but he spent significant amounts of time at Monticello and with his money again a second member of the Levy family repaired, preserved and restored Monticello. Jefferson Levy, a lifelong bachelor, was a very social man. When he was at Monticello he was often entertaining congressmen, senators, ambassadors, two presidents, Grover Cleveland made a trip up there, Theodore Roosevelt made a trip up there. You know he would also have the bridge club from Charlottesville come up, have meetings up there, the DAR and so on and so forth.

So what's that expression? No good deed goes unpunished. In 1912 a movement grew up to take Monticello from Jefferson Levy and turn it into a government-run shrine to Thomas Jefferson. It was led by a woman named Maud Littleton who was married to a New York congressman named Martin Wiley Littleton and she decided that she would, this would not stand, she started a national movement to condemn Monticello and turn it into a government-run shrine to Thomas Jefferson.

She had influence. A bill was introduced in congress to that effect in 1912 in which the government would condemn this property's private property and turn it into a government-run house museum. She had the time, she had the money, she had the inclination, she got petitions, she had people working for us, she had articles written, newspapers and magazines and this bill is debated in the summer of 1912 and Jefferson Levy, not a shy and retiring man, you know he once said when the White House is for sale then I'll sell Monticello. So here we have this series of hearings in 1912 in congress which were very bombastic.

Jefferson Levy and his lawyer he hired a man named Tom Duke, Judge Duke from Charlottesville who's like great grandfather was Thomas Jefferson's father's lawyer and Judge Duke and Jefferson Levy fought it out with Mrs. Littleton and her supporters for the future of his house. Some people called it the War of 1912. Well the War of 1912 ended in December when a bill came to the floor of the House of Representatives that would have done what we just said, condemned Monticello and turned it into a government-run house museum. It was defeated on what we would now call today a property rights argument. The government had never confiscated anybody's private property much less tried to turn it into a government-run you know shrine to one of our founding fathers. Well you know Jefferson Levy declared victory but Mrs. Littleton did not concede defeat so the bill was reintroduced in 1913 there were more hearings 1914 and then in October of 1914 Jefferson Levy who had swore he would never sell the place said okay okay I will and he said he announced that he would sell Monticello for five hundred thousand dollars which he reckoned was about half of what he had spent buying it repairing it preserving restoring it and taking care of it.

Well you know Congress could never wrap their arms around that five hundred thousand dollar figure. Now I have to tell you that the campaign to take Monticello from Jefferson Levy was tinged with anti-Semitism neither Mrs. Littleton nor her supporters ever said it out loud. Jews shouldn't own Monticello but she used code words in her speeches in magazine articles newspaper articles that were written on her behalf for instance they called they called the Levies aliens they called the Levians outsiders and how could they be less aliens I mean at this point Jefferson Levy is a sixth generation American it's unfortunate but we we can't tell the story without mentioning that. He announced that since Congress wasn't interested he put Monticello on the market for that five hundred thousand dollar asking price. He hired a realtor in Washington who specialized in Virginia states and there was a beautiful sales brochure that was put out with a woodcut of Monticello on the on the cover you open it up there's testimonials from Theodore Roosevelt from Marquis de Lafayette about how wonderful this place is and the next page says all this can be yours for five hundred thousand. Finally in 1923 the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation formed and met in New York City it was made up of lawyers and financiers some of whom had Virginia roots and they agreed to Jefferson Levy's purchase price in 1923 and I'll just end by reading to you from a closing table when they this is on in December of 1923 and a man who was there said that this was December 1st 1923 the cash and the bonds and mortgage were delivered to Levy and Levy signed the deed conveying full title of the to the property and all belongings to the foundation this was a very emotional scene and he burst out crying he said that he never dreamt he would ever part with the property three months later on March 6th 1924 at his home in New York City Jefferson Levy died of heart disease five weeks short of his 72nd birthday and I'll just finish by telling you that this man Jefferson Levy not a shy and retiring type like to compare himself to Thomas Jefferson you know he was named after Thomas Jefferson he was a tall man like Jefferson was you know he would make it a point to be at Monticello on 4th of July and he'd have an Independence Day party he would invite people up to the mountaintop from Charlottesville and guests they would picnic they would have bands patriotic music there'd be fireworks and supposedly he would end the evening by coming out on the lawn and reciting the declaration of independence from Thomas Jefferson's music stand and a terrific job on the production editing and storytelling by Robbie Davis and a special thanks to Mark Leipson for sharing the story of Saving Monticello which by the way is the title of his book Saving Monticello the Levy family's epic quest to rescue the house that Jefferson built and by the way it's so true when the house goes up for sale well no one wanted at the time it had a dome on it houses didn't have domes and of course it was on top of a mountain and in came the Levy family first Uriah and straight through to Jefferson wanting to keep this legacy alive and alive they kept it the story of Monticello the story of the Levy family the story of Thomas Jefferson and so much more here on Our American Stories When the world gets in the way of your music try the new Bose QuietComfort earbuds too next-gen earbuds uniquely tuned to the shape of your ears they use exclusive Bose technology that personalizes the audio performance to fit you delivering the world's best noise cancellation and powerfully immersive sound so you can hear and feel every detail of the music you love Bose QuietComfort earbuds too sound shape to you to learn more visit Bose.com T-Mobile for Business knows companies want more than a one-size-fits-all approach to support I want the world so we provide 360 support customized to your business from discovery through post-deployment you'll get a dedicated account team and expertise from solutions engineers and industry advisors already right now I want it now 360 support that's customized for your success that's unconventional thinking from T-Mobile for Business
Whisper: small.en / 2022-11-07 14:00:23 / 2022-11-07 14:08:13 / 8

Get The Truth Mobile App and Listen to your Favorite Station Anytime